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Browsing items in: Banjo Construction Photograph Archive

(576 results)



Display: 20

    • Bacon and Day

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • 1927 Bacon and Day Silver Bell No. 1. This particular banjo has a non-standard fretboard inlay that was most likely the result of a fretboard replacement at some point in time. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and...
    • Bacon and Day- Armrest

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • B&D banjos used Bestone armrests. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and operated by Fred Bacon and David L. Day. The company was started by Fred Bacon in 1906 in Forest Dale, Vermont and later moved to Groton,...
    • Bacon and Day- Armrest

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • The B&D armrest is held in place by two metal bands held in place by the hooks and nuts. In this photo we see both bands, but no armrest. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and operated by Fred Bacon and David L....
    • Bacon and Day- Armrest

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • Bestone armrest removed from the banjo. The gold color is the result of the nickel plating having been worn off the armrest from heavy use. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and operated by Fred Bacon and David L....
    • Bacon and Day- Armrest

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • Bestone armrest removed from the banjo. The gold color is the result of the nickel plating having been worn off the armrest from heavy use. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and operated by Fred Bacon and David L....
    • Bacon and Day- Armrest

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • The B&D armrest is held in place by two metal bands held in place by the hooks and nuts. In this photo we see one of those bands holding up the armrest. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and operated by Fred Bacon...
    • Bacon and Day- Armrest

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • Bestone armrest removed from the banjo. The gold color is the result of the nickel plating having been worn off the armrest from heavy use.The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and operated by Fred Bacon and David L....
    • Bacon and Day- Dissasembled

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • 1927 Bacon and Day Silver Bell No. 1 completely dissasembled. This particular banjo has a non-standard fretboard inlay that was most likely due to a fretboard replacement at some point in time. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • B&D banjos are generally always branded with the company name and location, the model of banjo, and the serial number. Here we see the company name and location. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and operated by...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • This photo shows the dowel, which is attached to the neck, at the point it runs through the rim. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and operated by Fred Bacon and David L. Day. The company was started by Fred Bacon...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • The dowel on B&D banjos generally always have the name and location of the company, the model and the serial number stamped on it. Here we see that this banjo is a B&D Silver Bell No.1. Also visible on the dowel in this photo is part of the mute...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • This photograph shows, on the far left, the heel of the neck and teh dowel coming out from the neck. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and operated by Fred Bacon and David L. Day. The company was started by Fred...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • In this photo, we see the fretboard , and the dowel coming out from the neck. The dowel sits inside a square hole in the neck designed to hold it in place. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was owned and operated by Fred...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel Hardware

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • The neck dowel is held in place at two points as it passes through the rim. On the tailpiece end the end pin holds it in place, on the neck end, the neck brace holds it in place. In this photograph we see the three pieces of the neck brace in...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel Hardware

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • The end pin is a modified screw that holds the tailpiece end of the dowel firmly to the rim. The end pin often also serves as an attachment point or stability point for the tailpiece. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel Hardware

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • The end pin is a modified screw that holds the tailpiece end of the dowel firmly to the rim. The end pin often also serves as an attachment point or stability point for the tailpiece. In this photo, we see the end pin in place and the hole that...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel Hardware

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • The neck dowel is held in place at two points as it passes through the rim. On the tailpiece end the end pin holds it in place, on the neck end, the neck brace holds it in place. In this photograph we see two of the three pieces of the neck...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel Hardware

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • The neck dowel is held in place at two points as it passes through the rim. On the tailpiece end the end pin holds it in place, on the neck end, the neck brace holds it in place. In this photograph we see the three pieces of the neck brace in...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel Hardware

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • The end pin is a modified screw that holds the tailpiece end of the dowel firmly to the rim. The end pin often also serves as an attachment point or stability point for the tailpiece. The Bacon Banjo Company was in Groton, Connecticut and was...
    • Bacon and Day- Dowel Hardware

    • Banjo Construction Photographic Collection
      Musical instruments
    • The neck dowel is held in place at two points as it passes through the rim. On the tailpiece end the end pin holds it in place, on the neck end, the neck brace holds it in place. In this photograph we see two of the three pieces of the neck...

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