Skilled Workers Manufacturing Jewelry, Providence, R.I.

Categories
Special Collections > Keystone Slides
Type
tiff scanned file from original glass slide
Description
Most people decorate themselves with some form of jewelry. It may be a tie pin, cuff links, brooch, fancy hairpin or hat pin, a breastpin, a ring or bracelet,-or what not? This is true the world round. Some wise man said that the more nearly one approached the savage state, the more jewelry he wore. It is likely that this man, somewhere about his clothing, found use for a piece of jewelry. It is true, however, that savages are especially fond of ornaments. You recall that the American Indians were especially fond of beads. The Central African believes in wearing a large copper or brass ring in his nose. Other tribes of savages pierce the lips with some kind of bar or pin which supports a ring or spangle. Finger rings are worn by peoples in all states of civilization. In our country the making of jewelry has become centered in southern New England, particularly in Rhode Island. This is due to the fact that the work in this industry is done mostly by hand. It follows then that it must be carried on where the population is dense. New England has this large city population and it has also the other facilities needed for factories,such as railroads and water power. Here you are shown how jewelry is made in one of the factories in Providence, R.I. Skill, care, and patience are all required of these busy workers. You will observe on the tables the tools of trade. Gas jets are needed to heat the metals, and bowls of water for rapid cooling. Here, too, are hammers, forceps, saws, tweezers,-all the finer tools that you see in any jewelry store in your home town. Providence is the largest center of jewelry manufacture in the United States. Keystone ID: 16773 Note: All titles, descriptions, and location coordinates are from the original Keystone Slide documentation as supplied by the Keystone View Company. No text has been edited or changed.
Rights
Copyright by the Keystone View Company. The original slides are housed in McConnell Library's Special Collections.