Tokyo, Japan

Categories
Special Collections > Keystone Slides
Type
tiff scanned file from original glass slide
Description
Here you have a view of Tokyo (t´ k-), the capital of Japan. Locate it on the map. It is on the Tokyo Bay, but this bay is landlocked. It therefore it not a port. Its port is Yokohama, 18 miles away. It is, however, one of the great cities of the world. In population it is the sixth largest city in the world. London, New York, Paris, Chicago, and Berlin only are greater in size. In contains over 2,000,000 inhabitants. Tokyo has been an important city in Japan for a long time. It was the seat of the government before there was a Mikado (m-kä´ d) or an Empire of Japan. It was then called Yeddo. The palace of the Emperor stands where the castle of the earlier rulers stood. The palace is in beautifully laid out grounds. Near it are the Parliament buildings, for the government of Japan, in form, is somewhat like that of England. In the business section of the city the houses are crowded together closely, and the streets teem with people. The city is only 10 miles long and 8 miles wide, and the houses are low. We know from this that the buildings are close together to hold 2,000,000 persons. Observe the heavy tile roofs. These keep the houses from being blown down by the typhoons. The houses themselves are generally slight buildings. Tokyo has an elevated railroad, electric lights, and street cars. It is the railroad center of Japan. It is about the size of San Francisco. Osaka is the next city in size after Tokyo. It is 3 times as large as Yokohama. Locate all the cities mentioned. What countries in Asia does Japan control? Japan has been called the "Great Britain of Asia." Why should it be so named? Keystone ID: 14032 Note: All titles, descriptions, and location coordinates are from the original Keystone Slide documentation as supplied by the Keystone View Company. No text has been edited or changed.
Rights
Copyright by the Keystone View Company. The original slides are housed in McConnell Library's Special Collections.