Street Scene, Hobart, Tasmania

Categories
Special Collections > Keystone Slides
Type
tiff scanned file from original glass slide
Description
If you will turn to your map of Australia and the islands of the Pacific, you will find south of Australia the island of Tasmania. On it there will be marked its leading city and capital, Hobart. It is a view of the principal street of this city that you get in the picture. Tasmania gets its name from a Dutch sailor called Tasman. It was he who first discovered the island in 1642. It was a long time after that, however, before Tasmania became well known to the world. It is an island not quite so large as Scotland. That is, it is about three-fourths the size of Cuba. Its entire population is less than 200,000. Like Australia the eastern side of Tasmania has a great deal of rainfall. Its western part is dry. It has beautiful lakes and mountains. A great deal of shipping is carried on. But this is not so important as is its mining. Hobart is only slightly over 100 years old. It is a city of 28,000 people. As you see from the view, it is up to date with its telephones, telegraphs, and trolley cars. The building on the corner at the left of the picture is the Union Bank, a bank owned and operated by the city of Hobart. We are sometimes likely to think of these faraway lands as half-civilized. This is far from the truth. Here is Tasmania on the opposite side of the world just as modern as we are. Many of our county seat towns are far less up-to-date than Hobart, and much smaller. Observe the street car. How does it differ from any street cars you have seen? What city in the United States is about the same size as Hobart. What large cities are nearest to Hobart? Keystone ID: 15903 Note: All titles, descriptions, and location coordinates are from the original Keystone Slide documentation as supplied by the Keystone View Company. No text has been edited or changed.
Rights
Copyright by the Keystone View Company. The original slides are housed in McConnell Library's Special Collections.