Lower City and Harbor, Bahia, Brazil

Categories
Special Collections > Keystone Slides
Type
tiff scanned file from original glass slide
Description
Which way is Bahia (bä-´ ä) from Rio de Janeiro? In which direction is it from the Equator? About how far from the Equator is it? Bahia is made up of two parts-a lower and an upper city. The lower part is the business section. The upper part is where most of the people live. It is the lower city you see in the view. Part of the harbor and the Bay of All Saints are also shown. The Bay of All Saints was discovered in 1503 by Amerigo Vespucci (vs-pt´ ch). He was the noted Italian traveler and writer of Geography after whom America was named. He was sent out by the Portuguese king, and he left at Bahia a number of his men to found a colony. The white people of Bahia are still largely Portuguese. From 1510 to 1763 it was the capital of the country. What is the present capital of Brasil? Bahia is the second largest seaport in Brazil. It exports coffee, sugar, tobacco, hides, cacao, diamonds, and fiber. It has lately been improving its harbor at a cost of almost $10,000,000. Several railroads run into the city from the country back of it. These carry the products of the pastures, of the coffee and sugar plantations, of the mines, and of the forests to Bahia. Bahia is the capital of the state of the same name, for it must be remembered that Brazil is made up of states just as the United States is. It is also the religious center of all Brazil. Here is where the Roman Catholic Archbishop (ärch-bsh´ p) lives. The city has a public library, a university, a normal school, and a college of physicians. In what form do you use the exports of Bahia? What is the chief product of Brazil? Keystone ID: 20838 Note: All titles, descriptions, and location coordinates are from the original Keystone Slide documentation as supplied by the Keystone View Company. No text has been edited or changed.
Rights
Copyright by the Keystone View Company. The original slides are housed in McConnell Library's Special Collections.