Independence Plaza, Montevideo, Uruguay

Categories
Special Collections > Keystone Slides
Type
tiff scanned file from original glass slide
Description
Uruguay (´ r gw) is the smallest country in South America. It would not make two states the size of New York. It is a grazing and a farming land. Cowboys ride over its plains herding their cattle. Herdsmen with great flocks of sheep range its pastures. At one packing house over 4,000 cattle are killed every day. Recently farms have taken the place of some of the cattle and sheep ranches. Cities and towns have sprung up all through the country. But the whole nation is yet thinly peopled, and there is only one city of any great size. This is Montevideo (mn´ t vid´ ), shown in the picture. In Montevideo one-third of the people of Uruguay live. It is a city with a population of 374,000. It is an important port, but it is so near to Buenos Aires (bw´ ns i´ rs) that not so much is heard of it as there should be. Its people are largely Spanish. In fact it claims to be more nearly Spanish than any other city in South America. Its buildings are not tall-rarely more than three stories. But they are modern, and are built chiefly of stone. Unlike many South American cities, its streets are wide and well paved. The plaza or public square here shown is one of the finest of the many parks in the city. Beyond the plaza you will observe the large building with the portico in front. This is a porch built over the sidewalk to shade it. Such porticos are common to Spanish-speaking countries. What rivers border on Uruguay? What other small countries are in South America? Where in the United States are cattle and sheep chiefly raised? Which of our cities is about the size of Montevideo? Name the three largest countries of South America. Keystone ID: 20829 Note: All titles, descriptions, and location coordinates are from the original Keystone Slide documentation as supplied by the Keystone View Company. No text has been edited or changed.
Rights
Copyright by the Keystone View Company. The original slides are housed in McConnell Library's Special Collections.